Game of Thrones

Game of Thrones Re-Watch | Season 1, Ep #5: The Lion & The Wolf

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Rob Cesternino and Josh Wigler continue “Winter Was Here” with a Rewatch of the “Game of Thrones” Season 1, Episode 5 “The Wolf & The Lion”

Rob Cesternino (@RobCesternino) and Josh Wigler (@roundhoward) launch their official Game of Thrones rewatch podcast, called Winter Was Here, in which they will look back on every single episode of the HBO series, week by week.

The podcast begins with a completely spoiler-free overview of Thrones and the Seven Kingdoms overall, before diving into spoiler-filled territory, in which Rob and Josh reexamine the series through the context of seven seasons worth of material.

Note: Spoilers beyond this episode begin at 15:05

  • TrentC

    What I’ve never understood is why Ned Stark became so angry with Jaime Lannister after Jaime slayed the Mad King. Everything I’ve read about Robert’s Rebellion points to Ned fully supporting Baratheon’s attempt to usurp the throne. They knew Aerys II was insane and killing innocent people in court and in the kingdom. A few of them were Starks. Noble Ned was a general in the rebellion and he must know that kings fall during these power struggles.

    Right after the throne was taken, Robert Baratheon ensured every Targaryen he could find was slain. Wouldn’t Aerys II have been a natural target to die? Not sure why Ned got such a stick up his butt over the incident.

    • SaraMadridista

      That’s always been a question for me since I started watching, why was Ned so angry over this thing? it didnt make sense, maybe the one good thing about Jamie at start of GOT is the fact that he killed the mad king,

      • TrentC

        It always makes me mad when a TV character doesn’t communicate that one vital sentence to someone else that could change everything.

        “I killed Aery’s because he ordered the deaths of _____ and he was planning to use wildfire and light up King’s Landing.”

        • J-me not Hi-me

          I don’t really mind Jaime not telling Ned why he killed Aerys, because Jaime’s the only one who suffers for that bit of stupid pride, but it would have been nice if he gave someone outside his family a heads up about the caches of wild fire all over the city.

    • J-me not Hi-me

      I think it’s a two part thing.
      1) The Starks are all about loyalty and honor. As a member of the Kingsguard Jaime had vowed to give his life to protect the King. So the fact that he literally stabbed the King in the back is the ultimate betrayal of his vows.
      2) Add to this that to arrive at the Red Keep Ned had to come through the sack of Kings Landing, where various atrocities were being carried out by Lannister soldiers. So when he sees a Lannister has betrayed Aerys his attitude is “The Lannisters are the WORST.”

      • TrentC

        I hear your points, but there had been so much that Ned and Robert’s armies were already doing against the Targaryens, because of Aery’s murderous actions, that it seemed like a disconnect that he chose to remember a rule at that point in the rebellion.

      • TrentC

        I hear your points, and also think that Ned and Robert had already killed a pile of Targaryens. Demonizing Jaime for what Robert or the next guy in the throne room was going to do anyways seems a little hypocritical. But yeah it’s Noble Ned.

        There was something in the book about Ned being the first one to see Jaime after he killed Aerys, and Jaime was sitting on the Iron throne because he was overwhelmed by what just happened. Ned took offense and got his wig all up in bunch over it.

        • J-me not Hi-me

          Had they killed anyone but Rhaegar? And that was in combat, so still honorable. 🙂 But anyway, honor has always been presented as both Ned’s strength and his weakness. He felt honorbound to keep Lyanna’s secret, which meant Catelyn felt betrayed and Jon grew up without a loving maternal figure. He also assumed the worst about Jaime without asking, which was arguably the beginning of the enmity between the Starks and Lannisters. I think it humanizes Ned to have him be flawed.

          On a related note I feel like everyone in ASOIAF has shades of grey, as opposed to being purely good or purely evil, except for maybe Ramsey.

          • TrentC

            I just re-read the books so you’d think I’d know the answer to your question. Robert thought Rhaegar kidnapped Lyanna, and that set off the conflict? Or was it Aerys II killing Starks and various people throughout the court before that? He lit some people up and killed another Hand if I recall correctly. I’m sure there were a lot of deaths before Robert and Ned saddled up and went to war.

            Actually, I have the inciting incident right here that started everything.

            Ned was jealous of Jaime’s hair.

  • TrentC

    Oh and we have to wait until winter of 2019 to see the last six episodes?

    *swears loudly in Dothraki*

  • SaraMadridista

    ok, question, was there foreshadowing for lord baelish in this episode over the use of dagger to kill Bran? when Tyrion said like who is the diot who would use their own dagger to assassinate a person?
    Also Arya way of entering the king’s landing is exactly the same as the way she entered winterfell? what does this mean?

    Also one more thing, arya’s listened to other people’s in the kingdom talking about the possibility of her’s dad death, so how does that have an influence over the story line of season 6? if arya didnt blame sansa at all, were the scenes in the episode when the two sister fought only played for audience? so confusing.

  • J-me not Hi-me

    Woah, Sean Bean’s wig looks especially egregious in that picture.

    • TrentC

      I was just thinking that! Jaime has a bit of smirk on his face as if to say – I’m the best swordsman in Westeoros and will prove it by knocking that ridiculous hairpiece off your head!