Star Trek: Discovery | S1, Ep #14 Recap, “The War Without, The War Within”

Listen to the Podcast

Star Trek Discovery | Season 1, Episode 14 Recap of “The War Without, The War Within

Rob Cesternino recaps the “Star Trek: Discovery” season 1, episode 14, “The War Without, The War Within” with Jessica Liese

  • Chris Basham

    The entire Discovery crew didn’t know that the Emperor was brought onto the ship, only Michael Burnham and Saru knew, and Saru ordered it to be kept secret in the transporter room.

    • Hornacek

      Don’t forget that one transporter guy that Saru ordered not to tell anyone. That’s why Saru had the Emperor transported to quarters instead of having her escorted through the ship.

      • Chris Basham

        Yep, another canon-defying “site to site transport” moment.

        • Hornacek

          Pretty sure previous Trek shows have transported someone from one location to another on the same ship.

          • Chris Basham

            I think it was only done once in TOS, never in ENT.

          • Hornacek

            What’s the difference between transporting someone from the ship to somewhere off the ship, and transporting someone from the ship to another location on the same ship? I fail to see how they are two scientifically different procedures, and how doing the latter in Discovery breaks canon.

          • Chris Basham

            Not to get too deep in the mycelial weeds on this because it’s not a big deal, but they are different procedures according to Memory Alpha. Besides, if there were no difference between a regular transport and site-to-site, why would they have transporter pads?

          • Hornacek

            That’s like saying why wouldn’t you park your car in your garage when you have the garage? Why park in the driveway or on the street? Because you *can* park there with your car, it’s just the garage is the recommended place to park.

            We’ve seen countless time of people being beamed from another ship/planet/etc onto the bridge or a non-transporter room location. In the world of Star Trek, it’s completely possible to beam someone when a transporter pad is not the source or target. It’s probably easier because the pads help lock in the beam (or something like that). But it’s not required.

          • Chris Basham

            Except, you aren’t “parking” people in a transporter room… you are transporting them there, and they immediately walk out and go to where they really wanted to be, like the bridge, sick bay, etc. Why not just always transport a person directly to where they want to be, always? Because as you acknowledge, it is “recommended” that they use the transporter room, and more resources are required otherwise.

          • Hornacek

            So earlier when you said that this show transporting someone without either the start or end locations being the transporter pad being not canon – what you really meant was that they were using the transporter in a way it was not originally meant, but perfectly capable of being used? Glad we cleared that up.

          • Charles Bikle

            They (Starfleet scientists ?) probably discover/theorize that it’s safer to just use the Transporter Pads. In TOS, there are a lot of plots involving someone running loose on the Enterprise, creating havoc; if Kirk could’ve just had the person/thing transported into the brig, that would have shut down a lot of episodes.

          • Hornacek

            It’s probably safer – like how you can brush your teeth in any room but you should probably do it in the bathroom because that’s the recommended room to do it in. Or sleeping in a non-bedroom.

            The transporter room is like the entry point for people coming onto the ship via the transporter. But just like a house where you don’t have to use the front door (window, back door), you can have someone come onto a ship via transporter and not use the transporter room for their beam-in location.

            Seriously, there’s nothing in the science of the Trek transporters that says you can’t transport someone to/from a location and not have the source or target be a transporter pad.

            And the reason Kirk didn’t use the transporter all the time in TOS is because it was cheaper to walk someone to the brig than pay to use the special effects.

          • Charles Bikle

            I’m theorizing/rationalizing stuff within the logic of the show(s); no need to bring up the real world budgetary reasons – anyone watching THIS particular show probably already gets that stuff.

          • Hornacek

            When discussing a science-fiction show, there’s no need to make real-world parallels to things done on the show? Um, did you even watch TOS? Pretty much every other plot was a sci-fi version of a real-world plot that they wanted you to think about and discuss when making comparisons to things in the real world.

          • Charles Bikle

            Not talking about that. I’m talking about this comment:

            “And the reason Kirk didn’t use the transporter all the time in TOS is
            because it was cheaper to walk someone to the brig than pay to use the
            special effects.”

            It’s not wrong, but has no place in a conversation about the in-story logic of Star Trek.

          • Hornacek

            It’s the real-world example of why the show created a specific technology – how is that not relevant when discussing the technology on the show?

            That’s like saying we shouldn’t talk about how the showrunners invented transporter technology because they wanted a cheap and quick way of getting people from the ship to a planet instead of having to have them in spacesuits and shuttles all the time.

          • Charles Bikle

            I give up. Best of luck in life.

          • Hornacek

            Sorry you got so stuck on not acknowledging that these are TV shows that has budgetary and logistical problems and limitations when they’re being made, and that those factor into the rules and logic of the characters and situations in the world of the shows.

        • Charles Bikle

          in TOS, maybe Dr. McCoy put a stop to inter-ship transport (he was never comfortable with them in the first place) and considering how many Transporter mishaps there have been in all of Star Trek, he probably had the right idea.

          • Hornacek

            I don’t think McCoy, a medical officer, had much say in how the transporter was used for the entire ship (or in all of Starfleet).

          • Charles Bikle

            OK, what would be your in-story reason/guess for why we never saw this used on TOS (or even that much in TNG ?)

          • Hornacek

            Because the writers never thought of it? Just because the writers never had TOS use the transporter this way doesn’t mean it was impossible and therefore not canon in Discovery.

  • Chris Basham

    In Enterprise season 4 episodes 15 and 16, the Klingons experiment with human Augment DNA and inadvertently create a virus. Dr. Phlox is kidnapped and forced to make a cure. One of the side effects is that the Klingons lose their forehead ridges and look more like they do in TOS. It’s implied that this appearance will last only a few generations.

  • TheTimelessOne

    i am gonna miss star trek when it ends it was fun season and i really hope they bring lorca back somehow.

    • Charles Bikle

      I have a theory that the Mirror Universe version of Discovery, faked its own destruction and they have the REAL Lorca on board as a POW.

  • Hornacek

    Another time a Trek crew has to return to Earth to save it is in DS9 when they think the Changelings have invaded Earth, but Sisko discovers it’s actually part of the Federation who are faking it so they can declare martial law (there are some Changelings on Earth, but they’re just there to observe, not attack).

  • dapete

    Anyone else notice the RHAP bell when Ash was getting his food out of the replicator?

  • dapete

    Jordon Kalesh was defeated on Chronos?!!