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Fargo Season 2 Episode 6 Recap | Rhinoceros


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Podcast Recap of Fargo Season 2, Episode 6, “Rhinoceros”

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We’re ready to talk about this week’s episode of Fargo until your dying breath. (Sorry about the death penalty snafu there.)

Josh Wigler (@roundhoward) was called back to Kansas City this week but Antonio Mazzaro (@acmazzaro) and Jeremiah Panhorst (@jpanhorst) placed a call to the mothership and beamed down Post Show Recaps’ own Mike Bloom (@amikebloomtype) to join them to talk about all the white-hot intensity from this week’s showdown-and-Weathers-heavy episode of Fargo. The jackboots are upon us! This podcast is a light on a hill, as the team digs deep into Peggy’s human-Pinterest psyche, and goes Karl crazy throughout.

We would love to hear your thoughts on the action this episode and the season, either in the comments below or by hitting us up through our feedback form.

  • Steve Davis

    **Potential Spoiler from scenes**

    I don’t think it’s a foregone conclusion regarding the spoiler for next week. 1. You don’t see a body and that person could be out of frame during said scene. 2. Even though she says you were supposed to ________, doesn’t mean that the person she is talking about is actually dead. She could just be referring to the entire act of what Milligan did. leading into 3. A head fake with what we are hearing and seeing on the preview. Since it’s a voiceover and you don’t really see anything conclusive, it doesn’t mean that what she said is actually true. All shows use this tactic in their previews (even Survivor). Maybe not to this degree but I don’t think it’s a concrete foul up by FX. If so, then poor marketing.

    • Antonio Mazzaro

      Good points Steve. I agree, could well be a swerve. Unless he catches a stray bullet I don’t think they go in there and execute him only, and I don’t know that Simone and Floyd would escape which we know they do. So it’s either death by a stray bullet (he was in the room that got super shot up and was not able to dive like Floyd and Simone) or he doesn’t go out like that. Seems like a wasted thing for him to not die in the stroke and not be seen on screen, so even if we cut back to the house and he is dead by a stray shot, the preview will have spoiled it. Seems sloppy to me right now. We’ll see.

      • John Davis

        Seems like the real spoiler is the scene with two open graves at the ranch graveyard. Still, it could be the “henchmen” section but I suspect it is two family members.

  • Omega Kin

    Now I’m sure he didn’t help when she was growing up but I believe he was giving his daughter sound advice. People with kids can identify who the loser or whore one is going to be. But parents mostly lie to kids. & she got exploited to set her family up, living up to her ho nature.

    And Peggy seems so delusional & selfish, I guess she is a great representative of feminism. She is the reason why any hope of family for them is ruined, another credit to that cause. The Gerhart mom shows strength in a real way I.e., in the non-modern woman way.

    • Antonio Mazzaro

      I definitely think that Peggy is meant to be shown as the sort of self-actualized person sure of her cause but not sure of the realities of how it impacts the choices she’s already made in life. Lifespring and other self help scams and hustles like that prey on people who want more and want a change but are often dug in too deeply as a result of choices they have already made. Like we’ve said on the podcast, I’m not sure what Peggy expected when she chose to get on the boring path Ed wanted, but it seems like that was a bad call.

      As far as Dodd goes, his approach could have been a million miles more delicate (note that Simone’s issue wasn’t as much with him telling her to dress differently, but straight up calling her a whore) and calling it “career advice” is really awful even if his reasoning was sound. There are a million better ways to tell your child you don’t agree with their life choices that aren’t threatening violence and calling them a whore for dressing provocatively. I think most parents don’t like the way their kids dress.

  • Lance Davis

    -The Law Offices of Weathers, Goodman, & Mazzaro. Sounds like a potential legal juggernaut. Thoughts? #Fargo #postshowrecaps

    • Antonio Mazzaro

      yes please.

  • TrentC

    Touching on the subject of change from last week’s comments, you guys noted that this episode shows us Floyd, Simone and Peggy in different moments of feminine ‘actualization’. Kirsten Dunst was my favorite example.’

    I really enjoyed the scene with Peggy and Hank. When Antonio talks about eye-acting, Dunst nailed it in that moment where Hank gets through to her. She’s looking off into the distance with two looks at once, one very serious look emerging from her regular life is fine look. Amazing bit of acting.

    One thing I didn’t care for was Bear’s behavior. I felt he gave in on the porch too easily and pretty much admitted that Dodd was right, and then let him do the whupping that should have come from the paternal figure. Or Floyd in this case. And outside the police station I felt that Bear once again showed a passive side, even if it was to potentially protect his son.

    I really liked one subtle bit of staging. When Karl is inside the station and already realizes dangerous gun men are outside, he grabs the bench and puts it against the door, then sits on it. With his back to the imminent danger. Is he drunk, really brave or does some part of him believe he is part of the physical judicial process and those bad guys will never attempt anything with him sitting there as a shield in the doorway? And yes, Karl ‘Mazzaro’ Weathers nailed it in this episode. His silent relief at the end of the standoff scene with Bear was like an inaudible sigh being let out over the space of minutes.

    I was confused about the scene where Ed walked away and Lou and Hank drove. To me it appeared that Ed went one way with Hanzee following and Lou/Hank drove the opposite way? Or was everyone heading over to Ed’s house?

    After Peggy gave Dodd the chest massage, don’t you think she would have tried to leave the house immediately? Or is she formidable enough to hang around home with an unconscious killer (and a dead one) in her basement? She certainly has a brand of inner strength.

    I know we’re moving towards the inevitable Sioux Falls Massacre, I sense we have an episode or two where our cast stays put for now. If Ed, Hanzee, Lou and Hank all end up at Ed’s place, I can’t imagine the result.

    Thanks for the recap gentlemen. I’ve heard and enjoyed Mike B doing The Historians and he compliments the regular crew of Mr Panhorst and Marshall Givens. (okay Antonio, love your thoughts and it’s last time I use that reference)

    • John Davis

      Is it possible that Karl sliding the bench in front of the police station door is a tip of the hat to the The Big Lebowski scene when the Dude nails a piece of wood to his floor and leans the chair up under the doorknob only to discover that the door opens out and the chair simply falls over when the bad guys open the door. One of the funnier moments in that great classic.

      • TrentC

        You have a good memory for an old fella! It was such a tense situation and that action really struck me as funny. Really looking forward to this week’s episode.

  • Buck Hondo

    While Floyd and Peggy are examples of women in the 70’s breaking with traditional societal roles in which they aren’t defined by the men around them, Simone has more difficulty doing that. She’s not rebelling against her father because she’s discovering her independence, she’s doing it to piss him off. She’s dressing the way she does and saying what she says because it gets her father to pay attention to her. Like when he confronts her and she lights a cigarette to show him she’s grown up and then she makes inappropriate sexual comments to him. It’s a role she’s trying to play because inside she really is a scared little girl, not a liberated woman. When Dodd gives her the “career advice” about being a whore, what does she do? She calls Mike for external validation, so he can say “there, there, of course you have a right to do whatever you want with your body.” It might have more to do with her age than her gender, but she’s no feminist and probably won’t live long enough to become one.

  • Charles Bikle

    Two thoughts about Dodd.

    1. As a kid, we saw that he was interested in that sci-fi movie and I wonder if he still is interested in UFOs/Sci-fi/whatever, but just keeps that as a secret hobby ?

    Also, what are the odds that Dodd gets taken away by the UFOs ?

    2 Crazy theory: Dodd and Hanzee are both secretly gay lovers.

  • Smookey

    I am enjoying your podcast, mostly. Two things I don’t understand:

    First, you spend a fair amount of time complaining about the split screen format. But you really don’t say why you are opposed to it. I mean, you say it distracts you from the story. But it’s obviously the filmmakers’ choice to have a stylistic, cinematic presentation. That’s a big part of what the show is about. If you really don’t like it, maybe this show just isn’t for you. Maybe in the next podcast episode you could dive into why you don’t like stylistic flourishes. Do you just want point and shoot, Law and Order, cinematography?

    Then the UFOs. What’s your ongoing problem with the UFOs? It’s a quirky show. Yes it plays with the “true crime” format, but it doesn’t really live there. There is precedent in the Coen brothers universe (the man who wasn’t there), puls it definitely fits the 70’s vibe. Again, maybe this show just isn’t for you.

  • DirectorEvil

    Antonio et al:
    Great work on the podcast. Keep up the good work.
    I am enjoying season 2 as much as I did season 1.
    One thing bothers me about the writing though.
    It doesn’t make sense to me that Hank and Lou haven’t called in the FBI yet.
    I know that right after the Waffle Hut massacre they debated whether to keep
    it a local investigation, or call in help and eventually decided to stay local.
    However, after the big shootout where Joe Bulo’s coif ended up in a box, the FBI would have had to get involved.
    I know it’s fiction, just saying….

  • sunny

    Just read that season 3 is ago! Love the podcast and the discussians that follow here